ACFID Media Coverage

ACFID Media Coverage

  • ACFID Opens Renovated Headquarters in Canberra

    14 Jun, 2019

    The Australian Council for International Development (ACFID) has re-opened its headquarters in Canberra following renovation works and has invited members, partners and stakeholders to visit the new ACFID House.

    ACFID’s President, Susan Pascoe, welcomed ACFID’s members and partners on Thursday evening (13 June) after 10 weeks of improvements which were made to ACFID House. (Header image: (L-R) Cheryl Johnson, Assistant Secretary of the NGOs and Volunteers Branch, DFAT, ACFID President, Susan Pascoe, and ACFID CEO, Marc Purcell, stand in the new reception area at ACFID House.)

    Local Ngunnawal Elder, Tina Brown, led a traditional Welcome to Country and Smoking Ceremony to mark the opening.

    Local Ngunnawal Elder, Tina Brown, prepares the Smoking Ceremony to mark the opening ceremony.

    Local Ngunnawal Elder, Tina Brown, prepares the Smoking Ceremony to mark the opening ceremony. 

    Addressing guests, ACFID’s President, Susan Pascoe, said:

    “This building has been a global meeting place. It has hosted Governor Generals, Australian Foreign Ministers, UN delegations, visiting delegations, dignitaries, partners, activists, campaigners and those who have shared their experiences with us from every corner of the globe.

    “Only a few months ago, ACFID hosted a group of young Yazidi people here in ACFID House to speak about the repression they faced and their campaign to free the Yazidi women still held captive in Baghouz in Syria.

    “In 1963, when ACFID was first formed a key, founding purpose was: cooperation and providing hospitality for visitors. That will undoubtedly continue."

    ACFID President, Susan Pascoe, addresses guests in ACFID’s new boardroom.

    ACFID President, Susan Pascoe, addresses guests in ACFID’s new boardroom. 

    ACFID’s President, Susan Pascoe, recognised ACFID’s invaluable partnership with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and Cheryl Johnson, Assistant Secretary of the NGOs and Volunteers Branch, who attended the opening on behalf of the department.

    The changes to ACFID House are the first renovations undertaken since it was opened by former Governor-General, Bill Hayden, in 1992.  

    The renovations have been planned for over two years following a people and culture strategy for the organisation in which improving the working environment was deemed a priority.

    The renovations include a more open and spacious office space, modern and light interior design, more meeting spaces for staff and improved technology for videoconferencing.

    ACFID’s Director Business and Corporate Partnerships, Mark Carpenter, who oversaw the renovations, would like to thank the ACFID Board, membership and staff for their support and architects, Clarke Keller, and main contractors, Rork Projects, for delivering the project. He invited ACFID's members and stakeholders to visit the new office:

    "We warmly invite all of our members, partners and stakeholders to visit our new HQ."

    ACFID’s new reception area between the two new refurbished staff areas.

    ACFID’s new reception area between the two new refurbished staff areas. 

    ACFID’s new kitchen and dining space for staff.

    ACFID’s new kitchen and dining space for staff. 

    ENDS

  • Federal Budget sees Treasurer Josh Frydenberg slash foreign aid by more than $115 million

    ABC News | 17 May, 2019

    Non-government organisations have hit out at the Coalition after it cut foreign aid in the Federal Budget, calling the move "selfish" and "short sighted".

  • Why money won't solve the challenges of foreign aid

    Australian Financial Review | 15 May, 2019

    Labor's $1.6 billion bid to restore Australia's foreign aid program will need more than the cash injection to achieve its aims, experts say.

  • Napping in the Pacific and millions spent changing very few lives: time to recast Australia's role in the region

    The Canberra Times | 13 May, 2019

    A new or re-elected government will give us a chance to better support our neighbours in Asia and the Pacific. The behaviour of the last one hasn't been good.

  • NGOs urge Australia to step up on foreign aid spending

    ProBono News | 13 May, 2019

    The opposition’s release of costings on Friday revealed plans to ramp up aid funds by $1.6 billion over four years, which would raise spending from 0.21 per cent of gross national income (GNI) currently to 0.22 per cent of GNI by 2022-23.

  • Labor pledge of extra $1.6bn for foreign aid falls short of long-term target

    The Guardian | 10 May, 2019

    Labor has promised an extra $1.6bn over four years for foreign aid, but the Coalition has accused the opposition of failing to fully fund its target for development assistance and an increased refugee intake.

  • Labor's foreign aid boost welcomed after Coalition cuts, but NGOs say more is needed

    ABC News | 10 May, 2019

    Aid groups have praised Labor's promise to ramp up foreign aid by $1.6 billion over four years, but say the pledge falls well short of the ALP's own policy platform.

  • Aid strategy hamstrung by deep cuts, lack of direction, peak groups say

    Sydney Morning Herald | 10 May, 2019

    The peak group for overseas aid says Australia’s influence in Asia will suffer from a shrunken development budget, but repairs could start for as little as $250 million a year if the increase was accompanied by a major strategic review.

  • Labor promises an extra $1.6 billion in foreign aid in surprise funding

    Sydney Morning Herald | 10 May, 2019

    A Labor government would increase foreign aid by $1.6 billion over the next four years in a bid to put Australia back on track to reaching a global target to help the world's poor

  • ‘Bolt from the blue’: Sector welcomes bipartisan support for foreign aid

    ProBono News | 08 Apr, 2019

    The Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade recommended the federal government, within a year, commit to a set timeframe of no more than five years for increasing Australia’s aid funding to at least 0.5 per cent of gross national income (GNI).

Pages