Commitment 1.3 We support people affected by crisis.

Compliance Indicators

Compliance with the Commitments will be assessed against the following Compliance Indicators. All of the applicable Compliance Indicators must be met by every ACFID Member to be considered compliant with the Code. Each of the Compliance Indicators has one or more compliance Verifiers. Verifiers are the description of evidence that is required to substantiate compliance with each Compliance Indicator. Guidance is also provided.

1.3.1 Members that support or undertake humanitarian assistance are guided by humanitarian assistance principles of humanity, impartiality, independence and neutrality.

Verifier

Policy, statement or guidance document that commits the Member to the humanitarian assistance principles of humanity, impartiality, independence and neutrality as defined in the Core Humanitarian Standard.

Guidance

The principles of humanity, impartiality, independence and neutrality are defined in the Core Humanitarian Standard.  They provide the foundations for humanitarian action and are central to establishing and maintaining access to affected people, whether in a natural disaster or a complex emergency, such as armed conflict.

An example of a statement that would satisfy this indicator is: "When responding to humanitarian emergencies, Agency ABC will apply the principles of humanity, impartiality, independence and neutrality as defined in the Core Humanitarian Standard on Quality and Accountability (CHS)."

1.3.2 Members that support or undertake humanitarian assistance recognise and work towards application of the Core Humanitarian Standard.

Verifier

Policy, statement or guidance document that commits the Member to recognising and working towards application of the Core Humanitarian Standard.

Guidance

The Core Humanitarian Standard can be downloaded in the Resources Section below.  

An example of a statement that would satisfy this indicator is "Agency ABC is guided by The Core Humanitarian Standard on Quality and Accountability (CHS)." Larger agencies or those with a predominant and significant focus on humanitarian assistance may choose to be formally audited/reviewed against the CHS by the Humanitarian Quality Assurance initiative. 

1.3.3 Members support or undertake humanitarian assistance coordinate and complement the work of others providing assistance.

Verifier

Policy, statement or guidance document that commits the Member to coordinating and complementing the work of others providing assistance.

Guidance

Detailed guidance for the implementation of this compliance indicator can be found under Commitment 6 of the Core Humanitarian Standard – refer to the Core Humanitarian Standard – Guidance Notes and Indicators in the Resources Section below. An example of a statement that would satisfy this indicator would be: "Agency ABC recognises that effective humanitarian responses require collective action. Agency ABC will share information and knowledge with other stakeholders, and participate in joint planning and integrated activities wherever possible, including national and local authorities, without compromising humanitarian principles."

1.3.4 Members support or undertake humanitarian assistance promote the role and leadership of local actors.

Verifier

Policy, statement or guidance document that commits the Member to promoting the role and leadership of local actors.

Guidance

During the World Humanitarian Summit, held in May 2016, the UN Secretary General called upon the international community to put local responses at the heart of humanitarian efforts. In response, a group of organisations working in humanitarian action committed to the Charter for Change, which seeks to promote more locally led humanitarian responses.

Your policy, statement, or guidance document could include: recognition of the role of local actors in a humanitarian response, a commitment to identifying local communities and organisations who can play a role in providing humanitarian assistance, and a commitment to promoting leadership by local actors on humanitarian responses.

An example of a statement that would satisfy this indicator would be: "In determining its humanitarian responses, Agency ABC commits to work with local communities and local organizations wherever possible, recognising that they are the first to respond, better positioned to respond and often last to leave." 

Good Practice Indicators

The following Good Practice Indicators describe a higher standard of practice than that set out in the Compliance Indicators. While Members do not need to meet the Good Practice Indicators to be considered compliant with the Code, they will self-assess against these indicators once every three years. This provides a clear pathway for Members to strengthen and improve practice over time.

  • Members have staff with expertise in humanitarian response relative to the scale of their humanitarian responses.
  • Members provide information and training for staff and partners on the Minimum Standards for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action and establish mechanisms to monitor compliance.
  • Members evaluate and reflect on the effectiveness of the humanitarian responses they support.
  • Members share the results of evaluations and reflections of humanitarian responses with partners and other key stakeholders.

GUIDANCE AND RESOURCES 

Good Practice Guidance

Policy

  • Develop humanitarian response and disaster preparedness strategies that incorporate and reflect international humanitarian response standards
  • Formally adopt the Core Humanitarian Standard
  • Formally adopt the Code of Conduct for the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and NGOs in Disaster Relief
  • Formally commit to the Sphere humanitarian principles and standards
  • Inform key stakeholders of the international standards to which you are committed through a full range of means, such as your website, partner agreements, donor requests, reports and staff induction and training
  • Develop formal emergency relief guidelines that incorporate and reflect international humanitarian response principles and standards

Procedures

  • Train humanitarian response staff in sector codes and standards and legal obligations, and communicate with them on a regular basis to ensure these are upheld.
  • Provide information and training for staff and partners on the Minimum Standards for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action and establish mechanisms to monitor compliance.
  • Ensure humanitarian responses do not contribute towards the unnecessary institutionalisation of children and any programs working directly with unaccompanied children will prioritise family tracing and reunification to prevent the prolonged separation of children from their families
  • Invest resources in building the capacity of partner organisations to providing humanitarian assistance according to internationally agreed standards and principles of ethical practice through training, knowledge sharing and accompaniment
  • Develop monitoring and evaluation systems to assess compliance with humanitarian response principles and standards
  • Establish systems for beneficiary communication and accountability, including feedback and complaints mechanisms
  • If you are sending funds, undertake due diligence to ensure that the party who receives them has committed to the relevant humanitarian response standards.

Drug donations

If your organisation provides pharmaceuticals or other forms of material relief, demonstrate your adherence to relevant guidelines, that could include but is not limited to:

  • Donations are based on the express wishes of the recipient and not distributed without prior consent
  • Donated drugs must be on the list of essential drugs of the recipient country, or if no such list is available, the WHO Model List of Essential Drugs
  • Donated drugs must comply with the quality standards of the recipient country and be authorised for use in that country
  • All donated drugs should have a shelf-life of at least 12 months upon arrival in the recipient country