Syria Humanitarian Crisis

Below is a list of ACFID members running emergency appeals for the Syria humanitarian crisis.

Syrian children taking part in activities at Save the Children's Child Friendly Space near the Syrian border, in Lebanon. Jonathan Hyams/ Save the Children

After pro-democracy protests in March 2011 and the subsequent government crackdown on protesters, Syria erupted into a brutal civil war with horrific consequences. The war has been raging for over five years between government forces, anti-government rebel groups, and terrorist organisations. According to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, over 312,000 people have been killed, including nearly 16,000 children.

The conflict has seen brutal tactics employed by all parties to the conflict: the targeting of civilian populations, including women and children, men and boys, the elderly, and people with disabilities; the abduction and silencing of lawyers, journalists and human rights defenders; the use of sexual violence against innocent civilians; the indiscriminate and disproportionate use of conventional and improvised weapons; the use of torture in detention centres; and the flourishing of a culture of impunity and disregard for those providing humanitarian assistance.

Approximately 13.5 million people in Syria are in need of humanitarian assistance, 4.8 million Syrians are refugees, and 6.1 million people are displaced within Syria; half of those affected are children, according to World Vision.

The ACFID members listed below are working in Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, Turkey, Egypt, Greece, Serbia and Croatia, either directly or through partners, providing emergency food and water, hygiene kits, blankets, and health and protection services.

How to Help

ACFID asks that people show their generosity with cash donations, rather than goods. The generosity of Australians is unwavering, but sending items such as clothes, food or bedding can have unintended consequences, like diverting the attention and resources of aid workers. Using cash donations, humanitarian agencies can direct supplies and materials to the right place, quickly and effectively.

Members of the public can be assured that their support is meeting identified needs. The standards by which ACFID members make appeals for donations for large emergencies and crises such as this are set by our Code of Conduct. This includes a responsibility to provide clear information to their donors on the emergency situation and the work they are doing with affected communities.

Act for Peace (and the NCCA)

ADRA Australia

Anglican Aid

Anglican Board of Mission

Anglican Overseas Aid

Australia for UNHCR

Australian Red Cross

CARE Australia

Caritas Australia

Islamic Relief Australia

Oxfam Australia

Plan International Australia

Save the Children Australia

Transform Aid International (trading as Baptist World Aid Australia)

UNICEF Australia

World Vision Australia

 

Last updated 15 December 2016