Home 5 Code of Conduct 5 Compliance

Compliance

Code Compliance

Mehrunnisa, 42, is a beneficiary of a High Efficiency Irrigation System and General Secretary of her Community Organisation. Through Oxfam’s training, Mehrunnisa has learnt to save every drop of water and grow her own vegetables. Otherwise, Mehrunnisa often walks for an hour to collect water. Photo: Khaula Jamil/OxfamAUS.

ACFID Members commit to being compliant with all aspects of the Code, and to continuously monitor their compliance. Compliance with the Code of Conduct enhances effective development practice. Non-compliance with the Quality Principles and Commitments set out in the Code of Conduct will reflect negatively on the individual organisation and the sector as a whole.

This section outlines the responsibility to be taken by each Member to ensure compliance with the Code of Conduct.

Compliance with the Code

Members must be compliant with all applicable aspects of the Code. To achieve compliance, Members will need to understand and apply the two key components of the Code:

  • The ACFID Code of Conduct: the 9 Principles and 33 Commitments that lay out the standard of practice to which ACFID Members commit.
  • The Quality Assurance Framework: a separate but linked document that details the Compliance Indicators, Verifiers and Good Practice Indicators for each of the Principles and Commitments of the Code.

Compliance with the Commitments is assessed against the Compliance Indicators as detailed in the Quality Assurance Framework (QAF). Each of the Compliance Indicators has one or more compliance Verifiers. Verifiers are the description of evidence that would substantiate compliance with the Indicator. To demonstrate compliance, Members will have the Verifiers in place, commensurate with the size and nature of their work.

Satisfaction of all Compliance Indicators is necessary to achieve compliance with the Code. To be compliant with the Code, ACFID Members will have the required policies, processes, guidelines and documentation in place appropriate to the size and nature of the organisation and its work. They will also ensure that their policies, processes and guidelines are implemented and subject to regular review.

Responsibility for compliance with the Code rests primarily with ACFID Members who self-assess against the Compliance Indicators. The governing body of each ACFID Member has primary responsibility for verifying compliance with all Compliance Indicators. ACFID undertakes relatively limited external verification in line with this principle of self-regulation.

The Code applies to ACFID Members and their international development and humanitarian programs. As signatories to the Code, ACFID Members certify that all parts of their organisation that are associated with international development and humanitarian initiatives operate in a manner that is compliant with the Code. It should be noted, however, that Code commitments relating to financial reporting apply to the entire legal entity of the ACFID Member.

Members are expected to use all reasonable efforts to support their implementing partners to operate in a manner consistent with the Code of Conduct when delivering aspects of a Member-supported initiative. There are some requirements which Members must extend to partners through MOUs or similar including those relating to child safeguarding, prevention of sexual exploitation and abuse, separation of development and non-development activity, financial wrongdoing and complaints handling. These requirements are clearly articulated in the relevant Compliance Indicators and Verifiers.

Assessment of Compliance

Compliance with the Code is assured through a suite of mechanisms by which ACFID Members are bound. These compliance mechanisms are:

 

Application for full ACFID Membership

  • To qualify for ACFID Full Membership, organisations must be compliant with the Code on application. On application organisations must complete the Code Self Assessment through the ACFID online portal and submit supporting documents to demonstrate their compliance.
  • On application, the organisation must provide copies of the additional documents that demonstrate membership eligibility and compliance as set out in the Membership Application Guidelines.
  • Organisations must complete the application process, including satisfying ACFID’s review of their Code Self Assessment, within 18 months of submitting their application.
  • Organisations are entitled to use the ACFID Member logo after they have been approved as interim Members by the ACFID Board.

Periodic Assessment

  • A minimum of one in every three years (as notified by ACFID), Members complete a Code Self-Assessment (CSA) and submit requested documents that verify their compliance with selected Compliance Indicators.
    • The CSA includes a declaration of compliance with the Code from the Member’s governing body. ACFID reviews Members’ self-assessment and supporting documentation
    • The CSA process must be completed within 5 months of the conclusion of the Member’s financial year.
    • Members must promptly respond to ACFID regarding any reasonable requests for clarification or additional information.
    • Members must comply with any resulting remedial actions.
  • On the years that Members are not required to complete a CSA, they must complete an Exceptions Report, which notes any exceptions to compliance that occurred during the previous year, and outlines actions undertaken to ensure that compliance is met.
    • The Exceptions Report must be provided to ACFID within 5 months of the conclusion of the Member’s financial year.
  • Members’ governing bodies submit their annual and financial reports to ACFID each year as part of their CSA or Exceptions Report. These reports are assessed in detail every three year as part of a member’s CSA.
    • Spot checks
  • ACFID’s ongoing assessment of risk identifies any areas of potential non-compliance that may be detrimental to the interests of ACFID, its Membership or the Code.
  • ACFID undertakes spot checks of compliance in these areas as needed.
  • This process includes checks of websites undertaken during emergency appeals.
  • Members must comply with requests for additional information to verify compliance as a result of these checks.
  • Members must comply with any resulting remedial actions.

Non-compliance

In the event of non-compliance, the Member must submit a plan that outlines how they will become compliant within a time frame of up to twelve months, or sooner if the area of non-compliance is considered higher risk. The Member must re-submit any required documentation at the end of that period. The onus is on the Member to submit supporting documentation and ensure compliance within that period. If a Member does not achieve compliance within that period, a set of sanctions may be implemented. These sanctions extend to the suspension and revocation of Code signatory status.

Members will notify ACFID if they become aware of major transgressions against the Code in their own organisation or make a complaint to the Code of Conduct Committee of major transgressions by other Members.

ACFID will publicise any suspension or revocation of signatory status.

For more information on the Code, read:

About

A woman in a brightly coloured scarf peers through coffee bean bushes on either side of her.

Annual Report 2021-22

Reporting on ACFID’s activities to ensure transparency and accountability

ACFID

ACFID is the peak body for Australian NGOs involved in international development and humanitarian action.

Our PARTNERSHIPS

ACFID works and engages with a range of strategic partners in addition to our members.

GOVERNANCE

ACFID is governed by its Board, ACFID Council, and various expert and governance committees.

Members

Conference

Conference 2022

HEALTHY PLANET, HEALTHY COMMUNITIES.

Acting with evidence, equity and inclusion for a resilient future.

Meet our Members

The ACFID membership is comprised of Australian NGOs that actively work in the international aid and development sector.

Become a member

Joining ACFID means joining an experienced and powerful mix of like-minded organisations committed to good international development practice.

Membership types & fees

ACFID has two types of organisational membership: Full Membership and Affiliate Membership.

State of the Sector

The State of the Sector Report provides a comprehensive and robust analysis of the state of the Australian aid and development sector.

NGO Aid Map

ACFID’s NGO Aid Map allows the Australian public and stakeholders to explore the work of ACFID Members around the world.

Development Practice Committee

The DPC is an expert advisory group of development practitioners leading good practice within the sector.

Our Focus

Budget Analysis

Federal Budget 2022 Analysis

Facts and figures on how aid is presented in this year’s annual budget

Strategic Plan

ACFID prioritises a robust response to climate change and pressure on civil society in developing countries, as well as other key priorities.

Emergency Aid

ACFID Members provide vital life-saving assistance in the immediate aftermath of an emergency.

Climate Change

Action on climate change is one of ACFID’s highest priorities, as it is an existential threat to humanity and our development.

Civil Society

Civil societies are a cornerstone of regional stability and ensure that the voices of the marginalised are heard.

Supporting NGOS

Supporting NGOs as Valuable Partners.

Inclusive & locally led development

Walking the talk on inclusive development.

Humanitarian Action

Taking humanitarian action for those in greatest need.

Elevating Development

Elevating Development to the Heart of Australia’s International Engagement.

PSEAH

Improving standards, practice and culture to prevent and respond to sexual exploitation, abuse and harassment.

Code of Conduct

A small girl stands in front of a multi-coloured finger paint artwork, with a blue paint covered hand

2022-23 ACFID Code of Conduct Review

The ACFID Code of Conduct is periodically reviewed to ensure it continues to reflect good practice and the needs of ACFID and its members.

Code of Conduct

The Code is a voluntary, self-regulatory industry code of good practice.

About the Code

Find out more about the Code of Conduct and how it operates.

Good Practice Toolkit

Overview and practical resources, and examples to support the implementation of the Code.

Spotlight on the Code

Provides a thematic ‘deep dive’ into each of the nine Quality Principles in the Code

Compliance

This section outlines the responsibility to be taken by each Member to ensure compliance with the Code.

Complaints Handling

How to make a complaint and information on the Code’s independent mechanism to address concerns relating to an ACFID Members’ conduct.

Other Standards

Mapping the Code with other professional standards and principles in the humanitarian and aid sector in Australia and internationally

Loading...